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Health & Safety

From The Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, April 27, 2017

Blood Drive, “A gift to save a life” and Autism awareness

The Health Office and grade 11 students at ICS are organizing a Blood Drive this Saturday, 29 April from 12:00 AM – 5:00 PM in the lower commons. This event will take place during the ICS spring Festival.

The Ethiopian National Blood Bank Services will be present with their professional team to collect blood. We are honored to host this event with them because our city, Addis Ababa is in great need of blood donors as there aren’t enough donors or blood to give to hospitals. So please donate to contribute to a great cause and help save lives. Donors will be screened before the blood donation and after donating drinks will be provided to all donors.

Also, we are glad to announce that the Transition department will be next to the Blood Drive for the Autism awareness event and all attendees can learn about Autism related information and services.

During the Blood Drive, nurses from the Health Office will be available to respond to any questions/ give nursing advice upon request.

If you have any questions or need more information, please come and see us at the Health Office.

We hope you can join us in the effort to help the community and give a gift to help save a life. 

Thank you,

The Health Office

From The Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, April 13, 2017

Stomach Flu

Here is what you need to know:

  • What is it? Many people talk about the "stomach flu" when they're feeling sick to their stomach. It isn't the same as influenza or the flu. Stomach flu is an illness called gastroenteritis, which is usually caused by a virus. 
  • Signs and symptoms: Someone with gastroenteritis may have stomach cramps, diarrhea, fever and nausea and might throw up/vomit. He or she will probably feel pretty sick for a day or two but will then get better. If you develop any of these symptoms, STAY HOME.
  • What to do: There is no vaccine or cure for viral gastroenteritis. If you have it, you'll want to rest until you feel better and rest at home. If you're vomiting, avoid eating solid food. Instead, sip fluids; such as water, or try a Popsicle. Your mom or dad also might give you an oral rehydration solution (ORS). That's a fancy name for those special fruit-flavored drinks that contain carbohydrates and electrolytes — stuff your body can get low on when you're dehydrated from diarrhea or vomiting.
  • Once you’ve stopped throwing up, you can try other kinds of clear liquids like chicken broth and juice. When you start to feel better, try eating bland foods like gelatin, toast, pretzels or crackers, bananas, rice and plain noodles. As your digestive system returns to normal, you can gradually go back to your regular diet.
  • How to prevent spreading: Gastroenteritis is contagious, which means that someone who has it can spread it to other people. It's spread by close contact with the person who is sick or by eating food that's contaminated. That is why it is important to wash your hands well especially before you eat and after going to the bathroom.
  • ICS Sick Policy: When a student becomes ill with symptoms of fever, flue like symptoms, vomiting or diarrhea, the student must stay home and he or she can return to school after 24 hours, being free of symptoms of fever (without medication), vomiting or diarrhea. Call the respective school offices to inform them that the student is ill at home.

EpiPen Use

The Health Office would like to inform the ICS community that uses EpiPen that some of then EpiPens & EpiPens, Jr have been recalled. This recall is due to the potential that these devices may contain a defective part that may result in the devices’ failure to activate.  The recalled product was manufacture by Meridian Medical Technologies and distributed by Mylan Specialties.

If you have an EpiPen, please refer to the website below and double-check your lot numbers with the ones listed. 

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm550170.htm

The Health Office at ICS have already checked all EpiPens that we have for each student and parents have been informed of any findings.

Please call us if you have any questions or concerns,

The Health Office

From The Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, March 9, 2017

From the Health Office

We are pleased to inform you that 97 children under 15 years old received the measles booster vaccine last Tuesday, 7 March. Our school supported this measles supplementary vaccination campaign that the Government of Ethiopia and the Ministry of Health was conducting.

We extend our gratitude to the District Health office of the Ministry of Health of Ethiopia for coming and administering the vaccines. We also thank the ICS administration for their support to this national vaccination campaign, which benefits the ICS community.

The Health Office wants to take this opportunity to ask you to review the vaccine schedule of your family with your doctor and update your vaccinations. Remember that vaccines reduce the risk of infection when bacteria or viruses invade the body and might cause illness. Vaccines help develop immunity by “imitating” an infection while not causing illness. Routine vaccines are not readily available in Ethiopia so take opportunity of your family trips abroad and get vaccinated as your doctor recommends. Some private clinic and hospital in Addis have available MMR (measles, mumps and rubella), hepatitis B, rabies and meningitis. Government offices offer polio, yellow fever, measles, rotavirus, BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine) tuberculosis, tetanus and hemophilia influenza (haemophilus influenzae type b) vaccines.

If you have any questions or need assistance, contact us at nurses@icsaddis.edu.et.

The Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Health Office

Flu and prevention

We are seeing a number of cases of influenza in Addis Ababa and we would like to remind you to practice the following steps to avoid and stop the spread of the flu virus.

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Put the tissue in the trash after you use it. Then, clean your hands, and do so every time after you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 15 or 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth as germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you are ill, please avoid those who are well.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, you may check with your health provider for medical advice.
  • Stay home when you are sick. If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness.

Influenza Symptoms

Influenza or flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills (oral temperature of at least 100 degrees Fahrenheit or 37.8 degrees Celsius).
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

ICS Health Office Policies and Procedures

When a student becomes ill at school with symptoms of fever, diarrhea and or vomiting, the student will be sent home after contacting parents. The student should stay home and he or she can come back to ICS after 24 hours of being free from symptoms of fever, chills, feeling very warm, flushed appearance, sweating, vomiting or diarrhea. All medications prescribed by a doctor will need to be given to the Health Office for administration while the student is at school. Call the respective school office to inform that the student is ill at home.

Contact us if you have any questions at nurses@icsaddis.edu.et

The Health Office

From The Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, January 26, 2017

News from the Health Office

“Stomach flu”

Recently we have seen many cases of “stomach flu” on campus. This is not influenza; it is called gastroenteritis and is caused by a virus. The symptoms include feeling unwell along with stomach cramps, diarrhea, nausea, fever and possible vomiting. You will probably feel pretty sick for a day or two but will then get better. If you or your child develops any of these symptoms please keep him/her at HOME.

Remember you need to keep yourself or your child hydrated. Stay hydrated by taking fluids like water, juice, Gatorade, or the best thing to do is to take oral rehydration solution ORS, which contains electrolytes that you lose when throwing up or having diarrhea. Always consult your doctor because this can also be a sign of other types of infection, like from bacteria or protozoa.

Once you are able to eat try clear liquids like chicken broth and juices, then try eating bland foods like gelatin, toast, pretzels or crackers, bananas, rice or plain noodles. As your digestive system returns to normal you can gradually go back to eating what you usually do.

Stomach flu is contagious; it can spread to other people by close contact with the person who is sick or by eating food that is contaminated. It is very important to wash your hands especially before you eat and after going to the bathroom. Do not share water bottles, utensils or food.

You need to STAY HOME if you or your child develops any of the above mentioned symptoms. The student can come back to school after 24 hours of being free of symptoms: no fever (without fever reducer medication) and no nausea or diarrhea.

Dry lips, skin and headaches

We have been noticing more visits with dry lips, skin and experiencing headaches and it seems that it is a consequence of the dry, warm and cold weather we are experience now in Addis and low intake of water by some people. We are advising all students, parents and teachers to stay hydrated throughout the day at school, home and work. Apply sunscreen before sending your child to school, send a water bottle with him/her, a hat, applied moisturizing cream and lip protector/moisturizing cream like lip balm.

If you have any questions, please call us at 0911558621 or email us at nurses@icsaddis.edu.et

Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Health Office

Blood Drive

Date: 3 December 2016.

Time: 1:00 - 5:00pm

  • Come and donate blood "Share Life give Blood “donation goes to Ethiopian National blood Bank Service.
  • Health Fair: You have the opportunity to meet representatives from different medical facilities.
  • Christmas Bazaar: Shopping for Christmas presents to take home.

Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016

Making strides: Walk for Type 1 Diabetes!

The walk is one day, the fight is every day.

This walk is a powerful and inspiring opportunity to unite as a community to support economically under-privileged children in Ethiopia who suffer from Type One Diabetes. Every step you take is personal and together we are helping to save lives. 

Please join us on the ICS Track this Saturday 19 November from 9:00 - 11:00 AM

No need to register, just show up, start walking and raise awareness and donations for Type One Diabetes.

T-shirts are being sold by the cafeteria and next to the Health Office. All proceeds from the t-shirt sales and donations from the walk will go to the Ethiopian Diabetic Association, a non-profit organization which works towards making the life of diabetic children, more bearable and more meaningful. 

Blood Drive

Date: 3 December 2016.

Time: 1:00 - 5:00pm

  • Come and donate blood "Share Life give Blood “donation goes to Ethiopian National blood Bank Service.
  • Health Fair: You have the opportunity to meet representatives from different medical facilities.
  • Christmas Bazaar: Shopping for Christmas presents to take home.

Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, November 10, 2016

Type 1 Diabetes walk and run event on 19 November 19 2016 from 9:00 to 11:00 AM.

Save the date! 

Come, join us and support this event. We would like to bring awareness in our community about Type 1 diabetes. We are offering different ways to support event You can get a beautiful butterfly pin which made by hearing disabilities for 50 birr, you can do the walk and run, you can get T-shirt for 200 birr and give your donations at the event. All your contribution will go to Ethiopian Diabetic association, to cover Insulin, glucometer, food for all children with Diabetes type 1. Our help makes them to go school and be part of the society.

Please join us for a great cause.

Health Office

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, November 3, 2016

Health Office

Making a difference in the LIVES OF CHILDREN affected by TYPE 1 DIABETES

Type 1 Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. The Pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. The person will be insulin dependent.

The Ethiopian Diabetic association is the provision of medicine to its very poor members based on donations secured. Medicines such as insulin, strips are given for free for those who are found in the lower income group of the society. The association always secures a certain amount of medicine to its members who cannot afford to buy medicines and who live in the regions.

Type 1 diabetic walk and run is a powerful and inspiring opportunity to unity as a community to support Type 1 Diabetes in Economical unprivileged children in Ethiopia. All proceeds from the t-shirt sales will go to the Ethiopian Diabetic Association. Every step you take is personal and together we are helping children with type 1 diabetes who can’t afford to buy insulin.

Please join us!

Health & Safety

Blog Type: 
Date Posted: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016

Cold and Flu-like symptoms on Campus

The Health Office would like to inform you that we are continuing to see cold and flu-like symptoms in the community.  These illnesses are caused by viruses that infect the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. The viruses are highly contagious spread from one person to another by coughing, sneezing, or even talking. It can also be spread by touching a surface with the virus on it and then touching your nose or mouth.

How can you protect yourself and others?

  • Stay home when you are sick. If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue away after use and wash your hands. If a tissue is not available, cover your mouth and nose with your sleeve, not your hand.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces or objects. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work, or school, especially when someone is ill.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, check with your health provider to get medical care

Symptoms

Cold

Flu

Fever

Sometimes, usually mild

Usual; higher (100-102 F, occasionally higher, especially in young children); lasts 3 to 4 days

Headache

Occasionally

Common

General Aches, Pains

Slight

Usual; often severe

Fatigue,Weakness

Sometimes

Usual; can last 2 to 3 weeks

Extreme Exhaustion

Never

Usual; at the beginning of the illness

Stuffy Nose

Common

Sometimes

Sneezing

Usual

Sometimes

Sore Throat

Common

Sometimes

Chest Discomfort, Cough

Mild to moderate; hacking cough

Common; can become severe

ICS Health Office Policies and Procedures

When a student becomes ill at school with symptoms of fever, diarrhea and or vomiting, the student will be sent home after contacting parents. The student should stay home and he or she can come back to ICS after 24 hours of being free from the cold or flu symptoms such as fever (100 degrees Fahrenheit or 37.8 degrees Celsius, measured by mouth) chills, feeling very warm, flushed appearance or sweating, vomiting or diarrhea. All medications prescribed by a doctor will need to be given to the Health Office for administration by a nurse while the student is at school. Call the respective school office to inform that the student is ill at home.

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